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rain

June 9, 2020

the first significant rain in weeks

water drops form like diamonds on the lady’s mantle leaves

it will soon be time to dye with the flowers

the trees are sighing in relief

another hexie flower in the window

from the inside looking out

in the rain I could/should be cleaning

but it’s more fun to weave

fringeless wedge weave – at the half way point

love-in-the-mist is blooming

they happily self seed – love the colour

when the rain stops this is an interesting neighborhood book swap to visit

I’ve never actually seen anyone sitting

 

10 Comments leave one →
  1. Going Batty in Wales permalink
    June 10, 2020 3:13 am

    Lovely photos Jean. Your weaving is beautiful – such soft gentle colours but not at all wishy washy with that vibrant blue stripe. I wish we had a book exchange here – with the library closed I am re-reading old favourites but some new novels would be welcome!

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    • June 10, 2020 11:56 am

      Sue – all the yarn is natural dyed, the stripe in the middle came from the idea of social distancing. There are several of the book exchange boxes in the neighborhood, it is really fun to see how creative people have been in building the “houses”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Going Batty in Wales permalink
        June 11, 2020 3:17 am

        I love the idea of representing social distancing in your weaving! The disadvantage of living in a very scattered community is that there are fewer initiatives like the book exchanges in yours.

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      • June 11, 2020 11:35 am

        Sue – I live in a residential community and walk sidewalks and paved roads every day – it is getting very boring. I do have a small park with a stream and ducks so that is a destination. Haven’t been going to the beach because too many people go and it is sometimes crowded.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. June 10, 2020 1:52 am

    WE grow heaps of Nigella at the allotment, and are now self sufficient in our own organic seed for curries (so, there’s the occasional little black fly protein in the jar – mostly the bugs crawl out!!)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. June 9, 2020 2:28 pm

    You are getting quite a Hexie-garden there in your window!
    Can you point me in the direction of a Lady’s Mantle flower dye recipe? The Hittys want to try it out!

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    • June 9, 2020 3:24 pm

      Kjerstin – I don’t always trust online dyeing advise but this one is reliable. https://colourcottage.wordpress.com/2013/07/09/ladys-mantle-alchemilla-lovefod/ I think you may be able to read it in the original language. I don’t do anything special, have only ever used the tiny flowers and an alum mordant. I leave the plant material in the pot (it shakes out fairly easily) and simmer for approx. 1 hr. then leave in pot overnight to cool. Gives a soft (not bright) yellow on wool and a little brighter on silk. Have fun, can’t wait to see who gets to wear it.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. June 9, 2020 1:48 pm

    Funny… I saw your header photo and thought ‘alchemilla mollis’, even before I read that it was Lady’s Mantle. I have a brain full of pointless scraps of information like that. Such as, for example, the fact that Nigella (Love in the Mist) seeds are one of the 5 ingredients of the Indian spice mix panch phoran. See what I mean?

    Liked by 1 person

    • June 9, 2020 2:22 pm

      Kate – I love both these, easy to grow and as you point out, full of interesting facts. Will be dyeing soon with the blossoms. Love-in-the-mist is perfect for this misty day. I took a few to my neighbor across the road who is starting a new garden.

      Liked by 2 people

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