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the heat goes on

August 13, 2015

a few drops of rain and we’re back to sizzling temperatures

blue and white at least looks cool

P1070369after a sample a much larger shibori piece

P1070381 back and front views show the difference that pole wrapping makes

12 dips in the vat, rinsed and pressed

very happy with this piece

P1070377in the studio, more samples

crackle threading woven as Bronson lace

the warp is a very fine worsted wool

as is the weft for the first sample

then 60/2 silk

P1070378it is extremely difficult to check for mistakes

a black cloth behind the weaving helps to show the pattern

P1070382

 I expect a significant change after washing

P1070367in the evenings

spinning on my Journey wheel

bombyx silk – luxury!

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10 Comments leave one →
  1. August 13, 2015 3:36 pm

    The indigo piece is stunning!

    Like

  2. August 14, 2015 12:59 am

    awestruck

    Like

    • August 14, 2015 6:35 am

      Neki – it certainly leaves me marveling at the time taken to produce a piece large enough for a kimono.

      Like

  3. August 14, 2015 3:32 am

    I love the shibori! What will you use it for, do you know?

    Like

  4. August 14, 2015 8:09 am

    Oh gee! I was quite pleased with my rather beginner-level shibori hankies until I saw your magnificent masterpiece. If you sew it up I want to see it!

    Like

    • August 14, 2015 8:53 am

      Louisa – the stitched shibori takes time and you get more complex with practise. I don’t have your dressmaking skills, I’m thinking of a light, loose fitting tunic with plain indigo side panels – or something – if you know of a simple pattern that fits that description let me know.

      Like

  5. vdbolyard permalink
    August 17, 2015 8:43 am

    really beautiful. hot here, too and humid. i do NOT like it. looking at your shibori makes me feel a little cooler. really!

    Like

    • August 17, 2015 9:12 am

      Velma – weather is shifting here, one day hot the next overcast,I love the heat. There is a reason yukata are traditionally blue and white.

      Like

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