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Tanabata

July 7, 2015

a  Japanese folk tale

tells the story of

Orihime, the weaving princess and Hikoboshi, the cow herder who fell in love

 when they neglected their duties

they were banished to the sky

and are represented by the stars Vega and Altair

they are permitted to meet, across the Milky Way, once a year

on the seventh day of the seventh month- Tanabata

celebrated by writing your wishes on pieces of paper and tying them to branches of bamboo

P1070199this year I wrote my wishes on rag strips and tied them in the Japanese maple tree

with the hope that they will reach the stars

meanwhile over 180 forest fires burn throughout the province

P1070178Sunday, at noon, the sun was just a pale glow in the smokey sky

P1070176our usually clear ocean air had a strange yellow glow

the horizon was barely visible

and the Olympic Mountains, in the distance, had disappeared

P1070180even the crows were unsettled

and we are miles from any of the fires

I think of the many people forced to leave their homes

and the fire crews working in dangerous conditions

P1070204while I am threading yet another warp.

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16 Comments leave one →
  1. July 7, 2015 3:05 pm

    It’s funny how we’re all connected. Our skies in Houston, TX are hazy from the smoke from the fires in Canada and dust from Africa. Two different jet streams. Hopefully the fires will end soon.

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  2. July 7, 2015 3:12 pm

    Happy Tanabata, there are wishes in my trees too! Some of them are for clear air and a little rain!

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    • July 7, 2015 3:34 pm

      Kjerstin = rain in my wishes, too. My eyes hurt, I think it must be the air. I can’t imagine living closer to the fires and the worry.

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    • July 7, 2015 4:06 pm

      Lis – I’m a little bit mystified by this?

      Like

      • Lis permalink
        July 8, 2015 11:02 am

        It’s an article about the tradition of tying cloth, ribbon etc on trees here in UK at wells which had significance to the Celtic religion. I was reminded of Madron Well when I read your post xx

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      • July 8, 2015 11:48 am

        Lis – thank you so very much, I had time later to go back and read, fascinating. I think you know I enjoy this kind of traditional info. Never heard of it when I lived in England but then we usually spent time in the New Forest. I’ve bookmarked the site for when I have the time to read all the postings. I have further plans for the rags when I take them down.

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  3. vdbolyard permalink
    July 7, 2015 3:55 pm

    oh, that smoke (and what it indicates) is frightening. of course you are putting on a warp!

    Like

    • July 7, 2015 4:04 pm

      Velma – now those in charge have decided that we will 20 new fires a day to look forward to. It helps to keep occupied!

      Like

  4. July 8, 2015 2:04 am

    our patron saint

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  5. July 8, 2015 2:47 am

    Folkloric weaving must be in the air, too–I just wrote about Arachne. The fires are so unsettling–I’m glad they’re far from you but feel for the people who are having their lives completely upended.

    Like

    • July 8, 2015 7:32 am

      Kerry – love those old folk tales, surprising how many of them include weaving, spinning, textiles.

      Like

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