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Christmas is coming

October 31, 2014

…. and the red towels are finished

P1050897normally I weave tea towels instead of samples

a weave structure I want to explore – 6-8 towels on one warp

then I move on to something different

P1050904with the Studio Tour on Nov. 15 – 16

I decided to do something Christmas-y

P1050906well – that’s enough!

yesterday I spent a very misty, rainy day on Salt Spring Island

P1050568it was so wet I didn’t take any pictures – this was taken in the summer

approaching Fulford Harbour on the ferry

I was the guest speaker at the Salt Spring Weaver’s Guild

it was the first guild I belonged to many years ago

even in the rain

it is a treat to meet old friends and spend some time with guild members

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12 Comments leave one →
  1. emilysuzanna permalink
    October 31, 2014 1:46 pm

    The tea towels look grand! Now need to order…by email?

    Like

    • October 31, 2014 3:22 pm

      Suzanna – email is best I think, if you give me some idea of which ones you are interested in I’ll send you close-up pictures and a fibre description etc.

      Like

  2. October 31, 2014 2:58 pm

    Your picture makes me want to be out in the Gulf Islands. Even in the rain they are lovely.

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    • October 31, 2014 3:20 pm

      Deb – I wish i had taken some pictures of the mist, it was lovely.

      Like

      • October 31, 2014 3:25 pm

        Misty days are always so quiet too and you tend to have beaches to yourself.

        Also, one quick question as you know everything about indigo. Does freezing hurt an indigo vat? Also can you let an exhausted vat evaporate down in the hopes of being able to reclaim some indigo from it?

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      • October 31, 2014 3:57 pm

        Deb – first – I most definitely DO NOT know everything about indigo. Every year I learn new things, one learns by doing. There are so many variables – how big is your vat, what was the recipe you used. My 30 gal. vat lives outside and gets very cold but has only ever had ice on the top. I try to stir it regularly and I don’t dye with it then but with some work I can get it going again in the spring/early summer. I clean the vat every 2 1/2 – 3 years, dry the stuff at the bottom and take it to the chemical recycle. The indigo is mixed in with all the chemicals, do you really want to play around in that for the small amount that is still viable??? If so wear a mask and cover your skin as it may give you a rash.

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  3. November 2, 2014 3:21 am

    I like your towels a lot! They were made using 8 harnesses, right? I’ve only used 4 so far but we have a loom now with 8 so maybe someday. I think I’ll just keep weaving towels forever!

    Like

    • November 2, 2014 7:59 am

      Kerry – yes, it is 8 harness. I think you could have fun forever. Wait until you discover linen!

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      • November 2, 2014 8:13 am

        Do you like working with linen? I’m told lots of weavers do not! I really want to work with it, because of my experiences with vintage linen, but I’ve heard it can be challenging. Should I just dive in?

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      • November 2, 2014 8:59 am

        Kerry – I love linen. Like every fibre linen has different properties and requirements. Back in the old days when people wove with a singles linen warp it could cause major problems and it got a bad reputation. It has no stretch, so tension needs to be very even and release it when not weaving. It can get fuzzy and cling – you can go the old way and make and apply a sizing (messy) I use unscented spray starch when required. Humidity makes a difference. I don’t wet the warp and don’t soak the weft bobbins in water. I know you would love the book “The Magic of Linen – Flax Seed to Woven Cloth” by Linda Heinrich. It has recently been re-published. You may be able to get it at a library, museum or university. She used to be a member of the Victoria guild, many of the weavings were done by guild members. I use a 40/2 yarn in the warp and a 20/1 yarn for weft (they are the same size). Do your studying, choose your yarns carefully and then go for it, have fun. You can email me if you need help. 🙂

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      • November 3, 2014 7:11 am

        Thanks for taking the time to write this! I ordered the book and can’t wait to get it. I bought some Irish linen awhile ago, from a weaver who is getting out of weaving, and I will do my homework and then it give it a whirl. And thanks, too, for the offer of guidance–it is MOST appreciated!

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      • November 3, 2014 7:26 am

        Kerry – happy to help. hope you like the book, start with something small with the linen.

        Like

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