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a penny for your thoughts

April 13, 2014

digging up the madder roots

they have been growing undisturbed for longer than the suggested 3 years

but I didn’t get to them in the Fall before the weather changed

P1040756Spring is probably not the best time to dig

but the Japanese anemone and the bluebells are taking over

I’ve saved several good crowns to re-plant

P1040757this is it

I let them dry in the sun and then brush the dirt off with an old toothbrush

rinse them quickly to remove the last of the dirt

and then grind them up in a blender- used only for dyestuff

P1040759for all my efforts I didn’t find any buried treasure

just this 1942 copper penny with the King’s head on the back

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. April 13, 2014 9:04 pm

    Maybe it is a good luck penny!

    By the way I wanted to pass on this blog post to you:
    http://sequinsandcherryblossom.com/2014/04/13/boro-japanese-textiles-at-somerset-house/
    When I saw that it was Japanese and indigo I thought you might be interested.

    Deb

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  2. April 14, 2014 4:48 am

    the roots look quite red (so does the lucky penny!), there must be a lot of pigment in them ,
    We find only old cow bones in our garden and mind you, we live very near a rich archeological center, they found lots of golden things there. But I might have some madder in 3 years too – some of my planted seeds are starting to sprout.

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    • April 14, 2014 7:45 am

      Alfia – I always look for something exciting when digging – this is as good as it gets! Good luck with the madder.

      Like

  3. lis.harwood@gmail.com permalink
    April 14, 2014 10:36 am

    The penny is probably worth more for the copper content than as an old coin !

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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    • April 14, 2014 10:39 am

      Lis – think the penny was in the ground for many years, it is in pretty rough condition. when I cleaned it up I was delighted to see the King’s head.

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  4. April 15, 2014 4:50 pm

    Is madder root the same as iris corms?

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    • April 15, 2014 5:30 pm

      Myra – madder is from the rubiaceae species used around the world for centuries used on wool, silk and cotton. When we were on one of our walks with Bryan he pulled up some wild madder and handed it to me. Nothing to do with iris.

      Like

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