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waste not, want not

November 23, 2011

another book to add to the vast collection

Mottainai: The Fabric of Life

Lessons in Frugality from Traditional Japan

an exhibition catalogue from the Portland Japanese Garden featuring works from the collections of  Kei Kawasaki of Gallery Kei in Kyoto an Stephen Szczepanek of Sri in Brooklyn

written in both Japanese and English.

Asa is the general Japanese term for baste fibre, hemp is taima

shown on a piece of my handspun hemp, handwoven, indigo/shibori cloth

most of us are now familiar with sashiko, once used as a mending stitch to hold together and strengthen rags it has taken on a more decorative use.

The fabric is my boro/indigo/sashiko quilt, still a work in progress  

the last time I was in Japan I was given a bundle of fibre that looked like very fine papery wood and encouraged to go home and “weave something”. Nobody seemed to know what the fibre was.

I wove it on a cotton warp, soaking wet and it was not easy. I now think it might have been elm or ohyo.

All 60 pages have beautiful photographs and brief descriptions. For those of you outside the U.S. the postage was more than the cover price of the book.

Mottainai can be translated as “waste nothing”.

 

 

 

 

8 Comments leave one →
  1. November 25, 2011 7:14 am

    I forecast that we will be coming back from Japan loaded with books, don’t you?

    Like

  2. November 24, 2011 7:43 am

    the book is a small, wonderful thing. i love how it feels. and of course, i love what it’s about.

    Like

  3. November 24, 2011 12:09 am

    you are the second person referencing the mottainai book.. must get my hands on it!

    Like

  4. November 23, 2011 9:18 pm

    Ahhhhh, looks like a “must have”.

    Like

  5. November 23, 2011 5:52 pm

    It looks like a great book to have. Just one more book na? Thanks for sharing it Jean – Hugs Nat

    Like

  6. November 23, 2011 4:49 pm

    They are absolutely gorgeous!

    Like

  7. arlene permalink
    November 23, 2011 3:22 pm

    All books are treasures; these books appear to be invaluable.

    Like

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