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magic moments

October 24, 2012

 it is the small events in life that truly matter, create memories and nurture friendships

someone (they know who they are) that I met through our blogs

gave me a collection of tools and materials for cutting and using stencils (katagami)

oh my! — rolls of kakishibu treated washi

paper cones and tips for tsutsugaki

punches for cutting patterns

silk gauze for reinforcing delicate patterns

ingredients to make rice paste and dyes

two skeins (16 oz.) of yarn that would appear to be silk paper

if anyone knows what this is called or how it is made I would love to know…?

and books…

two Japanese books of traditional stencil patterns

Harald Bohmer’s  Koekboya,  a book of natural dyes

The Silk Weavers of Kyoto  by Tamara K. Hareven, research, study and personal interviews with the obi weavers of  Nishijin, Kyoto. I explored and fell in love with this area when I was a student at Kawashima.

I am planning to host a workshop on a variety of Japanese techniques in 2013, many of these tools and materials will be shared

this is no small event and I am overwhelmed with the generosity and thoughtfulness of the gifter

and now, with only the vaguest idea of where this is leading me I’m prepared for the winter months

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18 Comments leave one →
  1. October 24, 2012 2:29 pm

    oh wow! what a fantastic collection of material; you should soon be quite the accomplished stencil cutter! i would love to come to the workshop next year; it’s possible as we are on the same coastline now. exciting!

    • October 24, 2012 2:40 pm

      Anastasia – I think it takes a lifetime of concentrated learning to become even a modest stencil cutter so I will attempt small and simple designs. I’ll keep you posted about next year as soon as details are confirmed. :) Jean

  2. October 24, 2012 3:25 pm

    I remember visiting a museum in Dublin that had display cases full of archaic gold objects that the label referred to as a “hoard” discovered during an archeological dig. It always struck me that this treasure had been hidden away for centuries, appreciated by no one, and really with no value. Treasure only has currency when it circulates – I think the giver knew you would bring it to life! (I too am looking forward to the workshop!)

  3. October 24, 2012 3:37 pm

    My oh my! What a lucky girl you are. I have no doubt that all this generous gift will be put to very good use and the knowledge shared with like minded people. Enjoy! How I wish I could come to Canada to do your workshop.b

  4. October 24, 2012 3:38 pm

    oh, LOVELY, jean, congratulations. fine and perfect gifts for you. i think it’s a superb idea and only wish i were closer. if you send me a couple of inches of it, i will try to figure it out! (i suspect, though, you know as much if not more than me.)

  5. October 24, 2012 4:32 pm

    Wow jean! A treasure trove! Gorgeous.

  6. October 24, 2012 7:16 pm

    What fun! Oh, the possibilities. Love that silk paper yarn, but, sorry, have no idea how to make that. When you find out, let us know ;)

  7. October 24, 2012 7:31 pm

    Yes what a great collection of objects and books, I look forward to seeing your creations. Now how are you going to find the time to weave too! Have fun….

    • October 24, 2012 9:03 pm

      Kathy – Kirstin — the silk yarn is hard to resist, have to think of something special to weave

  8. October 25, 2012 12:28 am

    How wonderful that whoever had these fantastic things knew that you would appreciate them and give them a new life and so was generous enough to pass them on. I’m looking forward to seeing the results of a winter of studying and stencil cutting. I too wish I could join your workshop but that’s not to be.

  9. October 25, 2012 12:51 am

    this is truly wonderful! enjoy the fun times ahead.

  10. October 25, 2012 10:29 am

    Lucky you! I especially love the smell of the kakishibu-treated stencil paper. Kind of smoky and spicy. (Yes, I’ve tried katazome!) Can’t wait to see what you do with this fabulous haul!

    • October 25, 2012 10:44 am

      Lousia – there are 7 1/2 full sheets of paper that have been rolled up and stored in a tube for a long time, the smell is heady. I stick my nose in the tube occasionally just to get a whiff.

  11. October 26, 2012 11:12 pm

    Unexpected treasures given to us make us feel overwhelmed and joyful, like children receiving a surprise. I am the same when someone brings me a bag full of old embroideries, your gift is really a special one.
    Wouldn’t be nice if I could come for the workshop on my way to LA?

    • October 27, 2012 8:58 am

      Blandina – it is the special, unexpected events that create a quiet joy in life.

  12. November 3, 2012 11:54 am

    This chapter considers the comparative strands between the Nishijin experience and that of the West. The questions addressed in this study are central to an understanding of the relationship between individuals and the process of social change in various parts of the world, past and present. An important contrast between Nishijin and England concerns the introduction of the powerloom. Nishijin weavers became frustrated when legislation or pressure from neighbors intruded upon their privilege of determining their own time schedules and control over the rhythms of work and leisure. Gender role division and segregation are far more powerful in Japan than in the United States. The Japanese quest for harmony requires that conflicts be suppressed and that individuals sacrifice their preferences and priorities to the common good and to the continuity and success of the house, the lineage, and the community.

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